Regions


American Federal



American Coin Silver Large Cream Pitcher 1860

.American Coin Silver Large Cream Pitcher 1860

code: wb4073

American coin silver large cream pitcher with embossed lily or ivy decorations, unmarked, c.1860. This elegant cream pitcher is 8 1/2" tall, 5 1/2" across the handle and the spout and weighs 421 grams or 13.5 ozs Troy. The pitcher is monogrammed CS to RAJ in an ornate period script. The soft, warm, original finish is present, with no buffing or machine polishing. The excellent original condition and clear, crisp detail, with no removals, repairs or alterations, make this an especially attractive offering.

$795.00


Ebenezer Moulton Coin Silver Helmet Form Creamer Late Federal

.Ebenezer Moulton Coin Silver Helmet Form Creamer Late Federal

code: wb3902

American Federal coin silver helmet form creamer by Ebenezer Moulton, Boston Massachusetts, c.1800. This handsome creamer is 5 1/4" tall, 5" spout to handle and weighs 152 grams or 4.9 ozs Troy. Monogrammed B in an ornate period script on both sides. The excellent original condition with no removals, repairs or alterations, make this an especially attractive offering. The soft, warm, original finish is present, with no buffing or machine polishing.

$1250.00


Ferderal Eagle Spout Teapot Coin Silver New York 1830 No Monogram

.Ferderal Eagle Spout Teapot Coin Silver New York 1830 No Monogram

code: wb3848

American coin silver teapot, New York maker, c.1825 - 1835, unmarked, possibly by William Thompson or Monell and Williams. This strikingly handsome, large teapot has a melon-reeded oval body on a stepped oval pedestal base; die-rolled floral, acorn, thistle and foliate scroll borders applied at the shoulder and edge of the base; Gadroon and beaded die-rolled borders applied at lip and top of base. The large flat hollow C scroll handle has a scroll and shell thumbpiece. Lid has concealed hinge and domed foliate finial. The fluted spout has a feathered large eagle head nozzle. Weighing 933 grams or 30 ozs. Troy, this special teapot is 10 1/2" tall, 13 1/2" handle to spout, with the body being 6 1/2" long and 5 3/4" wide. The soft, warm, original finish is present, with no buffing or machine polishing. The excellent original condition and clear, crisp detail, with no monograms, removals, repairs or alterations, make this an especially attractive offering.

$2495.00


Federal Sauce Ladle Davis and Brown 1800 Coin Silver Monogram RS

.Federal Sauce Ladle Davis and Brown 1800 Coin Silver Monogram RS

code: wb3793

American Federal coin silver sauce ladle by Davis and Brown of Boston, c.1800. This desirable sauce ladle is 6" long and weighs 26 grams. It has an ornate, period script monogram on the front of the handle: RS. Monogrammed as described above, the soft, warm, original finish is present, with no buffing or machine polishing. The excellent original condition and clear detail, with no removals, repairs or alterations, make this an especially attractive offering.

$125.00


William Moulton Coffin End Teaspoons 6 Coin Silver 1810 R L Murdoch

.William Moulton Coffin End Teaspoons 6 Coin Silver 1810 R L Murdoch

code: wb3673

American coin silver coffin end teaspoons 6 by William Moulton of Newburyport, Massachusetts, c.1810. Each of these Federal teaspoons is 6 1/2" long and the six weigh a total of 103 grams or 3.3 ozs. Troy. One of the spoons has its corners rounded off on the end of the handle, hence the reduced price. Each spoon has an ornate, period, inscription, within flourishes: R. L. Murdoch. Inscribed as described above, the soft, warm, original finish is present, with no buffing or machine polishing. The excellent original condition and clear detail, with no removals, repairs or alterations, make this an especially attractive offering. The price is for 6 spoons.

$225.00


Huge Stuffing Spoon Crowned Wreath Kinsey Coin Silver 1860 Monogram T

.Huge Stuffing Spoon Crowned Wreath Kinsey Coin Silver 1860 Monogram T

code: wb3652

American coin silver ornate stuffing spoon with a button on the back of the handle in a crowned wreath pattern by Edward and David Kinsey of Cincinnati, Ohio and Newport, Kentucky, c.1860. This scarce, desirable and useful stuffing spoon is 14 7/8" long and weighs 217 grams or 7 ozs. Troy. Monogrammed as described above, the soft, warm, original finish is present, with no buffing or machine polishing. The excellent original condition and clear detail, with no removals, repairs or alterations, make this an especially attractive offering.

$495.00


American Coin Silver Sugar Bowl Lion Mask 1815

.American Coin Silver Sugar Bowl Lion Mask 1815

code: wb3603

American coin silver sugar bowl with Lion Masks, sitting on three lion paws, c.1815. Unmarked, but similar examples by William Thomson of New York City. This elegant 1st Empire period bowl is 5 3/8" tall, 4 7/8" in diameter and weighs 400 grams or 12.9 ozs Troy. Monogrammed AL. The excellent original condition with no removals, repairs or alterations, make this an especially attractive offering.

$895.00


Coin Silver Federal Sugar Tongs 1815 Stillman Willis

.Coin Silver Federal Sugar Tongs 1815 Stillman Willis

code: wb3607

American coin silver sugar tongs by Stillman Willis, Boston, Mass., c.1813-1825. These elegant tongs are 6 3/8" long and weigh 40 grams or 1.3 ozs Troy. Monogrammed MD in an ornate period script. The excellent original condition with no removals, repairs or alterations, make this an especially attractive offering.

$175.00


American Federal Coin Silver Soup Ladle Massachusetts 1825 J Hansell

.American Federal Coin Silver Soup Ladle Massachusetts 1825 J Hansell

code: wb3581

American Federal coin silver soup ladle by James Hansell Philadelphia, PA. c.1825. This elegant soup ladle is 13 1/2" long and weighs 168 grams or 5.4 ozs Troy. Monogrammed WC in an ornate period script. The excellent original condition and clear detail, with no removals, repairs or alterations, make this an especially attractive offering.

$350.00


American Federal Coin Silver Soup Ladle Baltimore Samuel Kirk 1837

. American Federal Coin Silver Soup Ladle Baltimore Samuel Kirk 1837

code: wb3582

American Federal coin silver soup ladle by Samuel Kirk, Baltimore, assay date marked c.1837. This elegant soup ladle is 12 1/2" long and weighs 132 grams or 4.2 ozs Troy. Monogrammed B in an ornate period script. The excellent original condition and clear detail, with no removals, repairs or alterations, make this an especially attractive offering.

$250.00


Federal Coin Silver Sugar Tongs Philadelphia Henry Erwin 1800

.Federal Coin Silver Sugar Tongs Philadelphia Henry Erwin 1800

code: wb3518

American coin silver sugar tongs with engraved grape decorations, Henry Erwin, Philadelphia 1800. These beautiful tongs are 6 5/8" long and weigh 51 grams or 1.6 ozs Troy. The soft, warm, original finish is present, with no buffing or machine polishing. The excellent original condition and clear, crisp detail, monogrammed HRW in an ornate period script, no removals, repairs or alterations, make this an especially attractive offering.

$150.00


Federal Coin Silver Soup Ladle Robert Wilson 1810

.Federal Coin Silver Soup Ladle Robert Wilson 1810

code: wb3528

American Federal coin silver soup ladle by Robert Wilson, Philadelphia PA, c.1810. This elegant soup ladle is 14 3/8" long and weighs 180 grams or 5.8 ozs Troy. The soft, warm, original finish is present, with no buffing or machine polishing. N monograms or removals.

$295.00


Coin Silver Sugar Tongs I W Forbes New York 1802

.Coin Silver Sugar Tongs I W Forbes New York 1802

code: wb3517

American coin silver sugar tongs by I W Forbes, NY 1802. These handsome tongs measure 6 3/4" long and weigh 36 grams or 1.2 ozs Troy. The soft, warm, original finish is present, with no buffing or machine polishing. The excellent original condition and clear, crisp detail, monogrammed GEF in an ornate period script, no removals, repairs or alterations, make this an especially attractive offering.

$150.00


Ephraim Brasher Teapot Stand American Colonial Federal Coin Silver 1770 - 1790

.Ephraim Brasher Teapot Stand American Colonial Federal Coin Silver 1770 - 1790

code: wb3427

American Late Colonial or Early Federal teapot stand by Ephraim Brasher of New York City, c.1770 - 1790. This wonderful teapot tray is 7 5/8" long, 95 3/8" wide, 7/8" tall and weighs 205 grams or 6.6 ozs. Troy. It bears the EB mark of Brasher′s, stamped twice, and a later mark: Old Silver, likely applied by an early 20th Century silver dealer. Seymour Wyler was known to have marked his antique silver in such fashion. Not generally practiced by dealers in Antique Silver today, such a mark adds interest to this already special piece. The center of the tray has a later monogram: MME. There are no removals and the scroll feet are in excellent condition. Monogrammed as described above, the soft, warm, original finish is present, with no buffing or machine polishing. The excellent original condition and clear detail, with no removals, repairs or alterations, make this an especially attractive offering. This is truly a rare form from an iconic American Silversmith. Ephraim Brasher (pronounced Bray-zher) lived just a few feet from President Washington in New York. Washington resided at 3 Cherry Street and Brasher lived next door at 1 Cherry Street. Some sources give the address of Brasher as 5 Cherry Street. Cherry Hill was a fashionable section of New York in the 18th century, located just north of the Manhattan side of the present day Brooklyn Bridge. His business address was 77 Queen Street, not too far north of his home. Brasher was born in 1744 and lived to 1810, the entire 66 years a resident of New York City. He was married to Anne Gilbert on November 8, 1766. Ann was a sister of another New York silversmith, William Gilbert. Some sources state that Brasher did not have any children with Anne, or with his second wife, Mary Austin, whom he married in 1797, sometime after Anne’s death. Other sources suggest that he did. Indeed, an article by Richard Bagg and Q. David Bowers in the February 1980 issue of The Numismatist, “Ephraim Brasher, Originator of the Famous Brasher Doubloon,” mentions Ephraim’s great-great-great granddaughter, Deborah. This alone would suggest that he did have children. Ephraim and Abraham Brasher both served their apprenticeship with a silversmith, whose name (or names) are not known today. Ephraim took his studies seriously, and today there is beautiful silverware that survives with his counterstamp. Little is known about Abraham or his work, but Ephraim did excellent work and many pieces of his craft are seen in New York and New England museums. Brasher was also a respected member of the community. In his March 1987 Coinage article, “The Brasher Bicentennial,” David T. Alexander noted: “In the late 1700’s, silversmiths and goldsmiths were particularly respected members of the community, often acting as bankers, assayers, and authenticators of the Babel of gold and silver coins of the world which circulated in the bullion-starved colonies and the new republic.” Not only were Washington and Brasher neighbors, but Washington was also a customer of Brasher. He owned numerous silver pieces made by Brasher, including a number of silver skewers with a surviving receipt. It was certainly important for Washington to make a good impression at state dinners, which he did with the assistance of his Brasher silver. Ephraim Brasher was a member of the New York Provincial Army in 1775 and 1776, serving the role of grenadier. He retired from the militia in 1796 with the rank of Major. Later, he served local politics in New York, almost like serving national posts at the time. New York was the leader of banking and foreign trade, and was also the new national capital. Brasher served on the New York Evacuation Committee in 1783, marking the departure of British troops from New York City. He also served as sanitary commissioner from 1784 to 1785, coroner from 1786 to 1791, assistant justice from 1794 to 1797, election inspector from 1796 to 1809, and commissioner of excise from 1806 to 1810. In addition to all of his service, and his private business affairs, Brasher served the United States Mint in the early 1790s. This is known from a Treasury Warrant in the amount of $27, paid to John Shield as “assignee of Ephraim Brasher.” This warrant was specifically identified as a payment for assaying work that Brasher performed in 1792 for the Mint, following instructions of the Secretary of the Treasury. CLICK HERE for more on Brasher

$3250.00